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Posts Tagged ‘Sabbatical’

I didn’t typically think about it this way, but I was putting out product.  I’d write something and I occasionally gauged the reaction. Sometimes I’d get e-mail, sometimes I didn’t. Sometimes I’d write something I knew was good, but it wasn’t the kind of thing that motorcycle enthusiasts respond too. And then there were times I’d throw some snarky attitude out there to see if it sticks and I’d get surprised.

Like you I’ve aged.

My attention span became a precious commodity.  Time availability and the time demand trade-offs were always present.  And then there are the apps — email, social networks, blogs, micro-blogging and, yes, news outlets that have deployed an infuriating number of push alerts and notifications to distract.  Do we really need another reminder to post to Facebook?  No, I didn’t see that cat video post from a distant cousin?  Did I need that annoying notification that it’s been 4-days since my last photo posted to Instagram?  Buzz, Ding, Ding!  A friend of a friend of a friend just started a live video!  Who?

My time and your attention deserved more respect!

And speaking of time, you may have noticed that I took a sabbatical for a couple years.  Sipping coffee and admiring other motorcycle blog posts was a nice break and a different mindset.  I also spent cloudless summer days riding along the Northwest back roads reflecting on how I’ve run the Northwest Harley Blog for well over 10 years.  It started out as a hobby to capture the various motorcycle trips and riding experiences.  A secondary benefit was to shine light on issues and concerns affecting the motorcycle community along with the occasional rant or statement of ingratitude toward the motor company mixed in.

Thinking back, I approached my career like it was an investment: spreading risk and reward across a portfolio that included a full-time role in one industry, another side hustle in unrelated fields and an unpaid skill-building labor of love/writing — this blog.  But, after a couple of job changes the blogging, social media and content publication activity became a 50+ hour a week gig and during my “free” time the motorcycle blogging creative juices went MIA.  I was editing content, on the internet and social media all hours as part of my job to increase conversion rates, build up authority in a niche and increase a brands likability quotient.  I took actions daily and witnessed firsthand the difference social media and blogging could make in terms of organic search visibility, website traffic, leads, share-of-voice and stepping potential consumers through a sales funnel.

I developed a severe case of writers block, was off balance and needed a digital detox!  I did break the cardinal rule of blogging and just… stopped.  Mea culpa.

Fortunately,  I was able to enjoy some wind in the face time.  I’ll spend some time in separate posts and share some of those trips with you.  But first, I wanted to explain the absence, and to let you know — I’ll be slowly coming back, though the topics I tackle may be wide(r) and more varied.

All Rights Reserved (C) Northwest Harley Blog

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timeoutAccording to a 2008 survey by Technorati, which runs a search engine for blogs, only 7.4 million out of the 133 million blogs the company tracks had been updated in the past 120 days. That translates to 95% of blogs being essentially abandoned, left to WOW (wallow on the web), where they become public remnants of a dream — or an ambition — unfulfilled.

I started blogging in 2006 which seems like a long time ago… then in 2007, prior to taking off on an extended motorcycle trip I started the Northwest Harley Blog.  The thinking at the time was that a mix of hobbies (motorcycle and photography) would be a natural fit and thus was born — rantings of a motorcycle enthusiast.

Many people start blogs with lofty aspirations — try to build an audience and leave their day job, land a book deal, get attention from traditional media or simply to share their so-called genius with the world. I did not! Some even assumed that once they started blogging, the world would beat a path to their digital door.  Getting started is easy, since all it takes to maintain a blog is a time commitment and inspiration. Some actually believe those TV advertisements about some mommy blogger making $4,000 a month?

As a “closet journalist” I like to provide a unique voice and work to accurately report and find unusual angles on stories related to motorcycle causes and the industry.  I also like to provide chronologies of my various ride and rally wanderings. After two+ years, or put another way — after 500 posts, 873 photo’s edited/uploaded, and several thousand moderated comments later I feel the blog is a successful hobby after obtaining on average 24,000 unique monthly views, but it’s also at a cross-roads.

trollThe internet is different now.  It used to be about research, accuracy and quality entries.  The good bloggers had something to say about the big motorcycle issues of the day.  Now it’s about snippets from people who pump out dreck or large excerpts of other articles.  Original and high-quality content has become dumbed down.  Bloggers are required to spend more time ‘digg-n’, ‘tweeting’, ‘facebooking‘, ‘youtubing‘ and SEOing their posts than they do on the actual posts themselves. Even H-D is pushing their social media outreach staff to pump up the noise level on marketing messages in non-traditional channels — i.e. bloggers.

Sure it’s cool to have all this media presence, you can tweet ad infinitum and make videos clips if you’ve got a burning desire to do so… especially if you love new media and are thrilled to be in constant contact with your fan base or “tribe.”  In other words, if its an end unto itself.

But, that’s what bothers me.  There is a point of diminishing returns and a mental cost to all the work.  In the early days all that was required to “win” at blogging was to show up early each day.  Today?  You need a team of social marketers to get your message out, a second team to manage any fall-out from whatever you’ve said and a third to manage all the SPAMers and deletion of bad behavior rolled up by the Google machine in the form of drive-by trolls and haters who try and take up residence.  As a result blogs have a higher failure rate than restaurants!

Not all blogs fade from lack of reader interest. Some bloggers find themselves too busy — what with, say, band-camp, and swim practice, or perhaps even housework. Others graduate to more immediate formats, like Twitter or Facebook and drop evangelizing via the blog platform. And a few — gasp — actually decide to reclaim some small slice of their personal time.  This brings me full-circle about a decision.

I’m going to take a blogging timeout. Little if any new material will appear during the month of October.  I plan to resume in November.  Why?  Having blogged consistently for over three years now, I think it would be wise to take a step back and evaluate the effects (both good and bad) and determine what if any new direction should be taken.  If you have an opinion or viewpoint I’m sure you’ll let me know.

I appreciate the allegiance of the blog reader base who subscribe and those who visit the site regularly.  If you happen on to this site during the month of October I hope you’ll enjoy looking through the archives.

Enjoy fall and ride safe out there…

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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