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Posts Tagged ‘LiveWire’

A motorcycle braking system’s primary function is to adequately dissipate heat in order to increase the fade resistance and stop the vehicle.

The Italian company, Brembo, and their brake systems dominate the legendary circuits of the MotoGP and Superbike World Championships.

Solid Block of Aluminum

Brembo has recently introduced a new braking system for the Harley-Davidson flagship models as well as the new LiveWire with distinctive elements of performance, lightness and style.

It all starts with a solid block of aluminum, a material with extraordinary properties that not only have eye-catching surface finishings, but is able to combine low weight and stiffness.

The new radial monoblock caliper with 4 pistons (30 mm) boasts a unique design and the result takes full advantage of the material characteristics.

Motorcyclists know that caliper changes, even for an object of this small size may seem insignificant, but calipers are unsprung weights: even a few hundred grams more increase the braking distances, reduce the acceleration and make changing direction less stable/smooth.

New Radial Monoblock Caliper

Brembo manufactures braking components to ensure constancy of performance and that lever response is immediate with adjustable deceleration in any riding condition. Clearly, Brembo leveraged their 40-years of MotoGP success, to help improve the Harley-Davidson braking systems.

Another distinguishing feature of Harley-Davidson or Brembo’s OE braking system is the use of color.  Call it Italian creativity, but it is appreciated for its high quality standard, attention to detail and the importance of the braking systems’ aesthetics.

But, more to the point of aquatic habitats.

The Pacific Northwest is well known for its beer distilleries, marijuana shops, and hipster-forward culture (and lots of beards). It’s an attraction for foodies, coffee bean experts, hikers and features a diverse landscape of twisty back roads just outside the metro areas for wind in the face relief.

Salmon and the Pacific Northwest go hand in hand, but did you know that every time you grab and engage the brake lever, minute amounts of copper from brake dust is chemically degrading aquatic habitats, often in the form of toxic stormwater runoff which contributes to the killing of coho salmon?  It’s true.  Multiple studies demonstrate that stormwater runoff is unusually lethal to adult coho that return to spawn each year in watersheds.  The Washington State University study is HERE and the Ecological Society of America study is HERE.

To be fair, urbanization along with polluted runoff from automobile (268+ million in the U.S.) brake dust poses a greater challenge to fish species conservation, but motorcycle braking contributes to toxic stormwater runoff and recurrent coho die-offs.

Brembo Colors

I should’ve produced a truck load of “Save a Salmon, Don’t Brake” t-shirts hoping to get wealthy, but didn’t.

Are you looking for a way to get involved?  It’s expensive and not very practical for Harley-Davidson, but upgrading to carbon ceramic brakes don’t produce the same amount of toxic dust.

Motorcyclists can plant trees along the network of streams and rivers.  Or build rain gardens (vegetated basins or depressions which capture and absorb runoff) at their homes or neighborhoods to intercept stormwater that would otherwise flow onto city streets then to the rivers with polluted runoff — the main culprit for the decline of urban salmon populations.

Photos courtesy of Brembo and Harley-Davidson

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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Pan America™

At the EICMA (Esposizione Internazionale Ciclo Motociclo e Accessori), motorsports show in Milan, Italy, earlier this week — Harley-Davidson debuted two new bikes.  Important to note is the difference in the terms “launch” vs. “debuted.”

The Milwaukee MoCo has aimed one of motorcycles at a market segment in which Harley-Davidson has never really participated.

It’s my view that Harley-Davison is slowly trying to build higher walls to keep “enemies” (competitors) from invasion. Marketing types call this “relevance” and “barriers to entry.”  Multiple financial reports from the company clearly indicate a struggle to fire up a new generation of riders.  The growing presence of electric vehicles is undeniable, but the premium-priced electric (LiveWire) motorcycle — is a non·start·er in terms of revenue!

And at the same time, there’s been an invading army (BMW, KTM, Triumph, Yamaha, Honda or Ducati counterparts) of adventure touring bikes (ADV).  Importantly, this segment is where customers seem particularly excited to buy new models year-after-year.  Even Italy’s floundering boutique bike builder, Moto Guzzi, has had to double the workforce in its Mandello del Lario plant to keep up with demand for the new V85 TT adventure bike ($12,990).  It’s simple.  A fresh new design, a fresh new motor, and a capable around town, comfortable on freeways and durable enough for off-road riding gets customers excited to put down money!

We could have a long-debate on why Harley-Davidson spent millions of R&D dollars much too early as part of their electrification strategy and if the mainstream motorcycle market is ready to encourage motorcyclists to switch to electric vehicles.

But, lets return to the point at hand.

The first new motorcycle is an adventure touring bike (ADV) called the Pan America™.  Astute readers are likely to have déjà vu as it looks very similar to the Pan America concept motorcycle teased out back in 2018.

The Pan America has a new liquid-cooled 60-degree V-twin engine labeled the Revolution Max that displaces 1,250-cc and is reported to make 145 horsepower and more than 90 pound-feet of torque. Impressive stats, especially for the MoCo, which typically has built larger displacement engines with less power and more torque.  The new ADV motorcycle differs from traditional Harley models.  The first item, is exchanging the belt-style final drive for a chain drive that allows simpler gearing changes and improves on the ability to repair if something goes sideways on the trail.  The ADV also leverages a rear trellis-style subframe for strength and reduced weight, which allows motorcyclists to mount different types of adventure-isk luggage to it.

Other advancements include new radial monoblock four-piston caliper brake system developed in collaboration with Brembo and an inverted fork setup, which is common on ADV bikes.  From a styling perspective, you’ll either love the bird-beak nose and squinty cyclops-like headlight or not.

Harley-Davidson® Bronx™

The second new motorcycle is a middleweight class and called the Harley-Davidson® Bronx™. It’s reported to have a smaller 975-cc version of the Pan America’s Revolution Max engine and produces 115-horsepower and 70 lb.-ft. of torque.  Style wise, the Bronx looks somewhat cookie-cutter in this crowded “streetfighter” market segment.  From press photos the motorcycle appears to be belt-driven.  Both motorcycles will roll on new co-branded Michelin tires.

Harley-Davidson says that it’s aiming to have both the Pan America and the Bronx in showrooms by the end of 2020.

Huh?!  A year away?

I like the adventure touring bike (ADV) lineup, but if I was in the market to purchase, it’s unlikely that I’d stall buying for a year to purchase an unproven ADV motorcycle.  I also think it will be a mistake if the MoCo expects its Harley-Davidson name to garner an ultra-premium price in this new segment as it has in the EV market with the LiveWire.

The Pan American should launched and be in showrooms in March 2020, not “late” 2020.

Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson

All Rights Reserved (C) Northwest Harley Blog

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Harley-Davidson LiveWire

The Harley-Davidson LiveWire electric motorcycle was officially unveiled in January 2019 at CES.  A lot of marketing hype surrounded the unveiling of the motorcycle with claims of it being the start of “a new focus for the brand that would inspire the next generation of riders.”

Then yesterday, Reuters broke the news that Harley-Davidson had stopped production and delivery (temporarily) of the LiveWire electric motorcycles, after discovering an issue related to the vehicle’s charging equipment. It was reported that the company discovered a “non-standard” condition during the final quality checks of LiveWire, which it already started shipping to dealers in late September.  There were glitches found in the product which has prompted additional testing and analysis.

Interestingly, Webster defines glitches “as a sudden, usually temporary malfunction or irregularity of equipment.”  A glitch like this is not something riders want in a $30,000 purchase!

The LiveWire motorcycle uses a Combined Charging System (CCS), which is a single connector pattern that offers enough space for a Type 1 or Type 2 connector, along with space for a two-pin DC connector allowing charging at up to 200 Amps.  As part of the announcement, the motor company informed current owners to NOT charge the motorcycles through standard home outlets and use only ChargePoint (direct-current stations) charging stations at authorized Harley dealerships to reload the battery.

Well isn’t that “a jolt” of inconvenience?!

For most riders, you’d like to start your day fully charged!  Meaning home charging is normally done at night while you eat, play with the kids, watch TV, and sleep!  There are two Harley-Davidson dealers in the Portland, Oregon metro area that have installed ChargePoint stations.  Finding an alternative direct-current charging station to reload the motorcycle battery on the way to work and then waiting for a couple hours is certainly not ideal.

Charge Locations – Portland, Or. Metro

There are couple of things to know about public charging: the 3 different levels of charging, the difference between connectors and the charging networks.  Riders can go directly to a dealer or try and locate charging stations using ChargeHub.

Knowing your motorcycle’s capabilities is very important and consult the dealer if not understood!

Public Chargers Levels:
Level 1 is the standard wall outlet of 120 volts. It is the slowest charge level and requires tens of hours to fully charge a 100% electric vehicle.
Level 2 is the typical EV plug found in homes and garages. Most public charging stations are level 2.
Level 3 chargers, also known as DCFC or DC Fast Chargers are the quickest way to charge a vehicle. Not every electric vehicle can charge at level 3 chargers.

In general, electric motorcycles are in a phase of adoption known as “the chasm,” (See: Geoffrey Moore’s technology adoption curve) a gulf separating early adopters from the majority of consumers.  It’s a treacherous position in the life of new technology/products, and often determines their success or failure.  One could debate that Harley-Davidson is targeting a market that does not really exist: young, “green” and affluent first-time motorcyclists.

This unattractive “glitch” will be over soon enough, but it does little to promote value creation and owning a Harley-Davidson electric motorcycle.

UPDATE:  October 16, 2019 — An unidentified H-D source tells Forbes:  “This is an issue with the 120v [charging] system, which includes an on-board charger, so it could be a vendor issue with that charger, a wiring harness issue, etc. The point I’d make is that the QC [Quality Control] process worked…there’s an issue, it was discovered before the bikes were shipped to dealers and customers, and I assume it will be fixed.”

UPDATE: October 18, 2019 — TechCrunch reported that Harley-Davidson has resumed LiveWire production.  “After completing rigorous analysis this week, we have resumed LiveWire production and deliveries,” Harley-Davidson said in a comment emailed to TechCrunch. “Customers may continue riding their LiveWire motorcycle and are able to charge the motorcycle through all methods. Temporarily stopping LiveWire production allowed us to confirm that the non-standard condition identified on one motorcycle was a singular occurrence.”

Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson and ChargeHub

All Rights Reserved (C) Northwest Harley Blog

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UBCO 2×2 Electric Utility Motorcycle

I like watching the proverbial fire and brimstone post-apocalyptic movies as much as the next person (think: Mad Max, Twelve Monkeys, The Book of Eli, I Am Legend etc.,), but the Hollywood creations often incorrectly portray motorcycle transportation with flashy visuals and entertainment over realism.

Speaking about realism, September is National Preparedness Month (NPM) which highlights a time to focus attention on the importance of preparing families and homes for disasters that might threaten our lives and property.  It’s spearheaded by the U.S. government and this year’s overarching theme is “Prepared, Not Scared.”

I’m not sitting here eating peaches from a can and going all Eagle Scout on you, but being prepared when potential disasters occur by developing and practicing a family emergency response plan, assembling a disaster supply kit, signing up for alerts on mobile devices, setting aside emergency savings, and maintaining adequate insurance policies for our homes are important steps for disaster preparedness and valuable for everyone.

National Preparedness Month (NPM)

You’re likely thinking, hey Mac, the Harley is full of fuel, it get’s nearly 50mpg and I’ll just grab my “Bug Out Bag” and hit the road when the time comes.  But, what happens in a major crisis when the fuel production and distribution stalls or ceases?  Meaning Bob,  the local tanker truck driver is going to stop making his rounds to the gas stations and go find his family so no new fuel is distributed.

For that type of scenario a small, efficient electric motorcycle might be a great option — yes, you guessed it — I’m suggesting that you purchase a new $30K LiveWire Motorcycle that Harley-Davidson introduced last month.  Let’s call it the masterfully disguised “Prepper Bike” vs. an urban ride.  I can even envision a Harley-Davidson  marketing campaign to include a free survival knife and bandana when you purchase the motorcycle!

I’m being sarcastic, and was thinking about the UBCO 2×2 electric utility motorcycle.  It can be charged from solar panels in an off-grid location, which offers good range and maneuverability.  It has a lot of interest with those who need to bug out and want to keep a low profile.  Any motorcycle enthusiast who grew up riding the Honda Trail 90, will instantly relate to the 2×2.  The UBCO bike will only do 30mph, but it can carry up to 400 pounds (including rider) and cover 50 to 75 miles per charge. It’s nearly silent, and uses a 2-wheel-drive system for improved off-road performance — a feature that’s reminiscent of the classic ROKON gas-powered utility bikes. The battery packs are removable and interchangeable, so you can carry a spare to double the range. There are even USB ports and a 12V outlet for charging other devices such as your phone, GPS, lights, or tools.  The UBCO 2×2 starts around $7K and a spare 48Ah battery pack is $2K.

A sidebar:  The concept or story behind UBCO started in New Zealand.  UBCO had been actively visiting and investigating the U.S. market when it was contacted by Technology Entrepreneur Bob Ralston.  An investment opportunity was consolidated with Spring Capital in Eugene, Oregon and a dedicated distribution company was established in Eugene.  The idea of a Utility Electric Vehicle (UEV) that would transform the way people ride, work and play rolled out.

Even if uninterested in the EUM (electric utility motorcycle), discover your inner Scout and learn about the 130 Survival uses for a Bandanna that you are likely already wearing!

I’ve said it often, and will say it again: emergency preparedness is valuable for everyone!

Photo courtesy of Ready.gov and UBCO

Preparedness Resources:
Off Grid:  NPM 2019
Ready Gov:  September 2019
Preppers Bandanna: 130 Uses
Financial Preparedness: Finances
Community Preparedness: Neighborhood Prep

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2020 CVO™ STREET GLIDE®

It’s a slang expression and in general has the meaning of knowing if something is worth the trouble of trying to get it.

And in this case I’m thinking about the MSRP on Harley-Davidson’s 2020 lineup.

In 2019, the 10 models in the touring family: Road King; Street Glide; Road Glide; Road King Special; Electra Glide Ultra Classic; Street Glide Special; Road Glide Special; Road Glide Ultra; Ultra Limited Low; and Ultra Limited had starting prices which ranged from $19,289 to $28,089.  The new 2020 models starting prices range from $19,499 to $28,699.  The three 2019 CVO (Custom Vehicle Operations) models: CVO Street Glide (starting at $40,889); CVO Road Glide (starting at $42,339); and CVO Limited (starting at $43,889). The new 2020 CVO models are priced below.  I’m no Financial Samurai, but that’s getting squeezed!

But wait a minute.  Maybe it’s time to just accept the reason why the average new motorcycle price is so high is because the economy is booming and people seem to have money to spend. If people weren’t cashed up, prices would decline instead of rising to these historical levels.

So, let’s look briefly at the new 2020 models…

2020 CVO™ TRI GLIDE®

Harley-Davidson launched new models and a saddle-bag full of new technologies that are featured on the Low Rider® S model, the all-electric LiveWire™ model, a new CVO™ Tri Glide® model and a “re-styled” Heritage Classic.  Not mentioned in Harley-Davidson’s press release were the models which will not be returning for 2020: the Superlow, 1200 Custom and Forty-Eight Special, the Electra Glide Ultra Classic, the Ultra Limited Low and the CVO Road Glide. Also gone is the Road Glide Ultra, which is officially being replaced by the Road Glide Limited.

The LiveWire motorcycle as previously noted is powered by the all-new H-D Revelation™ permanent-magnet electric motor rated at 105 horsepower (78 kW) and producing 86 ft. lbs. of torque.  You may recall that back in January, Harley-Davidson made a splash at the Consumer Electronics Show (CES) in Las Vegas, with the LiveWire and stated they would start deliveries of the $29,799 all-electric motorcycle by this fall.  The motorcycle was initially rolled out for “beta testing” back in 2014 to H-D brand fans, but since then, the motor company has been working on fine-tuning the design and overall electrification.  Unlike an internal combustion engine (ICE), the H-D Revelation can produce 100 percent of its rated torque the instant the throttle is twisted, and 100 percent of that torque is always available, resulting in incredible, acceleration for an exhilarating ride. The LiveWire can accelerate from 0-60 mph in 3.0 seconds, and 60-80 mph in 1.9 seconds. And the high-voltage battery provides 146 miles (235 km) of city range or 95 miles (152 km) of combined stop-and-go and highway range as measured using the MIC City and MIC Combined tests.  The H-D Revelation motor is cooled by a water jacket, with coolant circulated through a small radiator, and is positioned longitudinally and low in the chassis to lower the motorcycle’s center of gravity, and aid maneuverability.

2020 Low Rider® S

The Low Rider S focuses first on performance. This motorcycle places emphasis on power, handling, and enhanced rider control, while maintaining the typical character of the Harley-Davidson. The motorcycle employs the Softail chassis, enhanced by premium suspension components tuned for aggressive riding and powered by the Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine.  The Low Rider S is really rooted in the legacy of the Low Rider models of the 1980s, that has a devoted following which spread world-wide from origins in Southern California.  The 2020 Low Rider S model has a base price of $17,999.

The Heritage Classic model has been restyled for 2020 “to give the bike a more appealing and nostalgia look of Harley-Davidson chrome.” The Heritage Classic is powered by the same Milwaukee-Eight 107 powertrain as the 2019 model and retains the same mechanics as its predecessor.  The base price for for the 2020 Heritage Classic is $18,999.

The Road Glide Limited, which replaces the Road Glide Ultra will offer the rider new premium luxury-touring features. The model is intended for long-haul touring and is equipped with the distinctive aerodynamic Road Glide shark-nose fairing with triple split stream vents that limit rider head buffeting. The motorcycle is powered by the standard Milwaukee-Eight 114 engine. The base price for the Road Glide Limited is $28,299.

2020 CVO™ LIMITED

The CVO Tri Glide is the newest addition to the company’s line of premium CVO motorcycles and labeled as the ultimate three-wheel motorcycle.  The trike will uphold the CVO standard for advanced technology, exclusive components, and attention to detail that is expected of CVO’s. The CVO Tri Glide will utilize the Milwaukee-Eight 117 powertrain that is unique to CVO models.

Base price for the 2020 CVO Tri-Glide is $48,999.
Base price for the 2020 CVO Limited is $44,039
Base price for the 2020 CVO Street Glide model is $40,539

The H-D™Connect service rolled out which is a cellular telematics control unit (TCU) that functions as an (LTE) enabled modem connecting the 2020 LiveWire™ and select 2020 Touring models to the cloud.  The service is built on the IBM Cloud and Panasonic’s OneConnect™ service.  It’s a ($12/month fee-based service – FREE 1st year) service that remotely connects the rider to their motorcycle through the Harley-Davidson App via a smart phone.  The built-in cellular connectivity with the IBM Cloud, IBM artificial intelligence (AI), analytics and Internet of Things will enhance the rider’s experience as well as keep the rider in the know with motorcycle status, notifications and alerts.  The press release, web site and product documents note that the service is not available in all markets and availability will vary.

H-D™ Connect

The motor company also launched the new Reflex™ Defensive Rider Systems (RDRS) — unlike previous model years Linked Brembo Brakes with ABS, the new system is a collection of technology designed to match motorcycle performance to available traction during acceleration, deceleration and braking, utilizing the latest chassis control, electronic brake control and powertrain technology.   With features like: Cornering Electronically Linked Brakes, Cornering-ABS, Cornering-Traction Control with modes, Drag Torque Slip Control, Vehicle Hold Control and Tire Pressure Monitoring (TPMS) the motor company upped it’s game to give the rider confidence and control in less-than-ideal situations.  Important to note is that RDRS is not a system to directly influence vehicle direction. This is a key difference between motorcycle RDRS and Automotive Stability Control. The rider is ultimately responsible for speed, steering, and path corrections.  The RDRS features are standard on the 2020 LiveWire, Trike and CVO models, and optional on all 2020 Touring models in the U.S. (except Electra Glide®Standard models).

Boom!™ Box GTS infotainment system has evolved with the latest look, feel and function of mobile phones and tablets and with durability and features designed specifically for motorcycling. Every element has been optimized to enhance the rider’s interaction with the motorcycle and connectivity.  Most notable is the GTS processes faster, has more memory and is much more responsive.  Start-up time is reduced from 21 seconds to 10 seconds,  Time to FM Audio is less than 6 seconds and Route calculation time is reduced from 10 seconds to 2.5 seconds.  The GTS replaces the Boom!™ Box 6.5GT system on MY19 Ultra Limited, Ultra Limited Low, Road Glide Ultra, Road Glide Special, Street Glide Special models, and is a factory-installed option on Street Glide, Road Glide and Ultra Classic models.  What DID NOT change and deserves a shout-out is the current audio sources are maintained: AM, FM, WB, XM, A2DP Bluetooth streaming and Digital Mass Storage compatibility!

Heather Malenshek, Harley-Davidson Chief Marketing Officer stated that “Harley-Davidson offers riders a host of new models, gear and accessories for 2020 as we leverage our unmatched ability to blend style, performance and technology in products designed to elevate the motorcycling experience.

Clearly rider and motorcycle assistance systems are rolling out faster and getting better at Harley-Davidson.  The advance technologies provide incremental improvements and make for inspiring marketing collateral.  But, the picture looks different for more price-sensitive customers when you shine a “Daymaker” headlamp on cost competitiveness.

The accelerating motorcycle costs are a good reminder that whatever you’re going through–whatever financial pressure or squeezing stress–the question at the end-of-day is–is it worth what it produces? i.e., is the juice really worth the squeeze?

UPDATED: October 1, 2019 — Previously neglected to include the role Panasonic Automotive has in connecting Harley riders to their motorcycle through a cellular connection to the telematics control unit (TCU) utilizing Panasonic’s OneConnect™ service. The OneConnect™ service complements the Harley-Davidson App and the new Harley-Davidson Connect service. Together, these systems link LiveWire riders with their motorcycle through their smartphone providing features such as motorcycle status, tamper alerts and vehicle location and service reminder and notifications.

References:
H-D Media Kit: (HERE)
More Roads to Harley-Davidson Plan: (HERE)

Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson

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Project LiveWire

Project LiveWire

It might make a good chapter in his memoir:  Harley-Davidson’s Matt Levatch:  “My Biggest Mistake.”

I’m talking about Project LiveWire and pivoting the motor company faster toward electric motorcycles.

As I previously posted, Mr. Levatch was “selected” to run the company after Keith Wandell retired.  A year after Harley-Davidson debuted the prototype for its LiveWire battery-powered motorcycle, Mr. Levatch states it will be much longer before the company’s new e-motorcycle will hit the market.  When pressed, Mr. Levatch narrowed down the possibility of an e-motorcycle launch sometime between 2018 and 2020.  Really?

Battery recharges seem to be the culprit.

LiveWire-FrontThat low-pitched whine we hear isn’t the aluminum-bodied prototypes in the wind.  Rather, it’s the ringing of cash registers at Zero Motorcycles and Polaris Industries who plans to release an e-motorcycle later this year.

Is it time for Matt and Musk to meet?  You know, that “Project Tiger” (the local code name for the Tesla battery factory east of Reno, NV) is on track and continues to move forward.  Mr. Musk might have some battery IP to provide Harley-Davidson.

Until they launch LiveWire, we can check it out in the action on the big screen. The latest Marvel blockbuster, called Avengers #27 or is that Age of Ultron, which features a prototype version of the electric bike driven by actress Scarlett Johanssen’s character Black Widow.

Photos courtesy of H-D.

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