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Posts Tagged ‘Jeep’

Nobody ever thinks it will happen to them or their systems.

I’m talking about building a digital defense and cybersecurity vulnerabilities.

Heads up Harley-Davidson!  The more connected motorcycles become, the more likely they are to get hacked.  Each new “connected” motorcycle feature introduces greater complexity, and with complexity inevitably comes vulnerability.

Motorcycle enthusiasts have spoken and Harley-Davidson listened.  Riders want increased connectivity not simply for productivity’s sake, but also for convenience.  It’s easier to, for example,  interact through the head unit and display an interactive map as the motorcyclist drives towards their destination, versus putting the address into the user’s cell phone’s app and trying to watch the map on the phone and drive.  So, riders use apps for Android and iPhone (Apple CarPlay), that leverage the smartphone for the head unit (HU) display.

At what point does the motorcycle become a data center on two-wheels?  Any part of the motorcycle that talks to the outside world is a potential inroad for attackers. And malicious actors have been incredibly productive, creating immense numbers of threats world-wide.

Do you think I’m ‘inflating’ this out of proportion?

Car versus motorcycle hacking makes great headlines and let’s take a look at a few recent vehicle examples: a moving Tesla Model S is hacked and the hacker remotely controls the brakes (Tesla was forced to develop and distribute a software update to resolve); a Jeep Cherokee was remotely accessed via the UConnect entertainment center from a laptop miles away and disabled it’s transmission (Fiat Chrysler, was forced to recall 1.4M vehicles); a 100M Volkswagen vehicles can be unlocked by hacking the signals from their keyless entry fobs; and then there was Hyundai’s Blue Link, a cell phone application for users to interact with their vehicle.  Users are able to lock, unlock, start and stop the air conditioning or heat, and start the vehicle from a remote location. In addition, the app allows for stolen vehicle recovery and vehicle health reports to be emailed to the user and other parties for scheduling service etc.

SOUND FAMILIAR?

Consider that earlier this year the Harley‑Davidson™ App and the H-D™ Connect service launched which allows owners to connect remotely to select 2020 Touring and LiveWire motorcycles.  The H-D Connect service provides cellular connectivity that can link a Touring and LiveWire owners with their motorcycle through their smartphone using the Harley-Davidson App. H-D Connect allows owners to connect remotely to their motorcycles and allows for viewing of key vehicle health information as well as stolen vehicle recovery and other parties for scheduling service etc.

A computerized motorcycle’s main defense against hacking used to be the fact that all of its systems were separated from any network. But with the rise of telematics systems, connected apps, and onboard WiFi, that’s no longer the case. Harley-Davidson owners now face similar security issues to computers or smartphones and, like those devices, “ironclad” software is the main line of defense and will be as susceptible to attack, just as the user’s home and office PC are.

I’ve previously posted about the larger Internet of Things (IoT). Basically, this means everything in your home that connects to the world wide web. Smart TVs, digital assistants, smart watches, fitness trackers, home security devices, thermostats, refrigerators, and even light bulbs are all on the connected list. Add to that all of the fun stuff: remote-controlled robots; games and gaming systems; interactive dolls; and talking stuffed animals … the list is endless.

And now we have connected Harley-Davidson motorcycles.  What do all of these have in common?   They send and receive data.  The essence of the Harley-Davidson digital transformation is interconnectivity. Interconnectivity is about more than the connections between devices — it is about the connections between customers, partners, and suppliers.  But, do you know how that data is collected, where it is stored, for how long and where it is going?

It’s not clear how serious Harley-Davidson takes the threat of potential cyberattacks on their motorcycles. Given the concerns of hackers doing a “drive-by” on your digital life and the number of malicious actors I’d like to see more transparency from them in regards to motorcycle digital defense — or we risk ending a road trip before it really begins.

Harley-Davidson Privacy Policy – HERE
Harley-Davidson Information Sharing Policy – HERE
FBI 2018 Internet Crime Report (PDF) – HERE

Photo courtesy of Cyber Defense Magazine and FBI

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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Harley-Davidson Press Release

In mid-August, Harley-Davidson rolled out a press release (on the Canadian news wire) to announce the launch of a global campaign that embraces “The Freedom of The Open Road.”

It’s part of a 10-year global strategy to build the next generation of Harley riders and the new brand platform is “All for Freedom, Freedom for All” which comes to life with videos containing user-generated and filmed content that shares moments of the open road by riders past and present.

The ambitious campaign goal is to increase Harley’s brand relevance and inspire those “sleeping license holders”  to experience the same freedom that all current Harley riders feel with the wind in the face and ultimately to purchase a motorcycle.

The Harley-Davidson marketing group is using the #FindYourFreedom hashtag to generate social media awareness.

It’s common knowledge that when using a hashtag, you are categorizing your post and is viewed as a valuable tool when marketing your brand.  The objective of course would be to find a hashtag that has never been used previously and one that would really set the campaign apart from all the other social media noise.  However, there is another large company with an equally large brand that is already using the #FindYourFreedom hashtag with an associated marketing campaign.

They spell it:  J E E P  — you know, the company with an adventurous lifestyle that requires an adventurous vehicle!

While you can’t legally own a hashtag, the marketing 101 manual suggests that you chose one that people will associate with your brand, by leveraging a distinctive phrase or word associated with your company and messaging that marketing execs would, at best, like to see go viral or, at worst, contribute to the marketing campaign in a very positive way.

Think about it.  Harley-Davidson just launched a multi-year campaign and is encouraging motorcycle fans to join the social media conversation of a larger Jeep fan base!

The marketing folks may have actually “muddied” the Harley-Davidson brand or made it vulnerable by this hashtag gone wrong.

Photos courtesy of Harley-Davidson and Jeep.

All Rights Reserved (C) Northwest Harley Blog

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