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Posts Tagged ‘ARRA’

In Oregon, when you purchase a custom motorcycle or Moped license plate for your ride the surcharge supports and benefits the Oregon passenger rail program.

Huh?

What’s the Passenger Rail Program you ask?  It’s responsible for the planning and development of Oregon’s growing passenger rail service, including contracting for train and motorcoach service and supervising rail improvement projects within the federally designated High Speed Rail Corridor between Eugene and Portland.  You might recall that last year the federal American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) allocated $8 Billion to jumpstart the development of improved high-speed intercity passenger rail service in the U.S. The Pacific Northwest Rail Corridor received $598 Million. Of that amount, Oregon was awarded $8 Million in the first round for three projects.

The custom motorcycle license plate surcharge provides this program even more financial resources.  However, for automobiles the Cultural plate surcharge supports The Oregon Cultural Trust.  The Crater Lake plate surcharge supports Crater Lake National Park.  The Salmon plate surcharge supports the Oregon Watershed Enhancement Board and Oregon Parks and Recreation Department.

It’s not clear how much the surcharge generates in annual fees for the program, but shouldn’t the motorcycle license plate surcharge support or benefit a MOTORCYCLE program?  Like maybe the Team Oregon motorcycle safety training program would be a logical recipient for custom plate fees?

Some motorcycle riders have experienced prejudice from other motorists, law enforcement, or insurance companies, but this is irrefutable proof of the anti-motorcycle prejudice built into the “Salem legislation system.”

Photo courtesy of Google Pictures.  Shout-out to Mike for the surcharge/fee link.

All Rights Reserved (C) Northwest Harley Blog

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Canadian Rockies

Canadian Rockies

If you’re into snow-capped peaks, breathtaking mountain passes and twisty roads mixed with the occasional waterfall… riding to the northern Rockies by way of Rogers Pass and the Canadian Glacier National Park should be on your short list.

It was a warm morning departure for our 8 day adventure of ~2000miles.  We rushed an obligatory breakfast at Elmer’s and set out leaving the city by way of the Lewis and Clark highway.

Maryville Winery

Maryville Winery

We headed east on Washington State Hwy14 (SR14) and enjoyed the sweeping views of the Columbia River before heading north on Route 97 (US97). US97 is a 322-mile route through Washington state which traverses from the Oregon state line at the northern end of the Sam Hill Memorial Bridge in Maryhill, north to the Canadian border in Okanogan County near Oroville.

Wenatchee By Moonlight

Wenatchee By Moonlight

We tried to stay cool traversing the major cities of Goldendale, Yakima, and Ellensburg through a northwest heat advisory.  Our arrival in Wenatchee was greeted with short gasps to get air as the sweltering heat set an all-time high of 107 degrees!  The day also recorded Seattle’s hottest day (103) in its history.  We’d had enough of the triple digits and elected to cool off before continuing. Note: I had the FXRG Perforated Leather Jacket on all day, but once the temp hit 97 degrees I stripped clothing to a t-shirt.  I’ll provide more on how the jacket faired during this trip in another post.

The next morning our early departure was met with temperatures already in the mid-70s.  We wanted to get some miles under our feet before high temps set in for the day.  We headed north on 97A which runs right along the west side of the Columbia river and then rejoined US97 at Lake Chelan.

VLBA Radio-Telescope

VLBA Radio-Telescope

Between Brewster and Monse, WA I was reminded of the movie Contact starring Jodie Foster.  Remember the scene where she is sitting atop her car hood under the Very Large Array of satellite antenna’s listening to space?   Well on the west side of the river dotted with farm tractors is a Very Long Baseline Array (VLBA) station.  It looks like a secret “military” base, but is really part of a ten radio-telescope antenna system, each with a dish 82 feet in diameter and weighing 240 tons.

Canada Border Crossing

Canada Border Crossing

Others are located from Mauna Kea on the Big Island of Hawaii to St. Croix in the U.S. Virgin Islands.  The VLBA provides astronomers with the sharpest vision of space compared to any telescope via radio waves!  It’s funded by The National Science Foundation (NSF), an independent federal agency that supports fundamental research and education.  In fiscal year (FY) 2009, the NSF budget is $9.5 billion, which includes $3.0 billion provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA).  A list of “shovel ready” ARRA funded projects at NSF is located HERE if you’d like more info on how the $$ are being spent.  But I’ve digressed…

FXRG Jacket Testing

FXRG Jacket Testing

By the time we rolled through Oroville the temps were again in the high 90’s and the air was hazy with smoke.  Before heading towards the Alaska Highway at the Yukon border which is known as British Columbia Highway 97 (BC97) we were “processed” by the Canadian Border Services Agency (CBSA) officers.  After a long wait due to a large number of RV’s we were subjected to several difficult questions meant to trip up any unsuspecting armed terrorist… “Where you from?”, “Where you going?”, “How Long you gonna be here?”… you get the drill.  After a hour long process I couldn’t help but think that if the CBSA ran Apple Computer we’d all be running Apple II’s, having to insert an identity card every time we booted up and required to surf at dial-up speed  — yeah, it was that painful!

Kelowna, BC - Bridge

Kelowna, BC - Bridge

After the “land of poutine” passed us through the international border crossing we made our way through Oliver, Penticton and along the western shore of magnificent Okanagan Lake for many kilometers to finally arrive in Kelowna, BC.  A thick haze filled the air as a reminder of the tinder-box conditions of the province and the hundreds of fires.  The local newspaper proclaimed “Wildfires Scorch BC” with thousands of evacuee’s and sad tales. In fact, seeing across the street was a challenge and breathing reminiscent of sitting around a camp fire about to extinguish itself.

After  a couple of days riding we enjoyed refreshments and some Montana Cookhouse baby-back ribs then headed down to the marina to take in some of the local nightlife and Okanagan Lake experience.

The 107 to 47 Journey – Part Two HERE; Part Three HERE; Part Four HERE

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Yamaha YZ400

Yamaha YZ400

Three years ago I sold my (purchased new) 1978 Yamaha YZ 400 to a good buddy.  At the time I was downsizing and making room in the garage for other more active projects and the bike received little ride time.  My buddy had plans to ride with his kids and though there are days I regret selling the ‘ol yellow buzz bomb, I know it has a good home!

The vintage MX was clean, ran very strong and was most reliable.  Meaning it would sit for months in the garage and within a couple three kicks blew blue smoke on any neighborhood kid brave enough to stand next to the ride.  I recall that Yamaha expanded on a good thing with the 1978 YZ’s as it became very stable with the box section aluminum swing arm and longer travel (at both ends). The bike was a bit heavy (tipping the scales around 240 lbs.) but long gone were the cracks in the frames, common with the previous (non-Monocoque) designs. The rake was also a bit long which made that year YZ400s better at cross-country than in motocross.  The bike was always more motocross(er) than I had skills.   Get cocky and it reminded me of broken ribs near Lee’s Camp…so, I’d back off the go-juice!

Speaking of dirt bike riding and the main point of this post – I want to raise your awareness on the Consumer Product Safety Improvement Act (CPSIA).  It bans numerous youth products with lead content and prohibits selling them.  Simply put the consumer product law passed last year bans the sale of quads/ATVs, dirt bikes and associated accessories for use by young people (Youth 12-15).  This was the response from our legislators after the outrage and calls to do something when U.S. toy companies allowed China to ship lead-laden toys to American toddlers. 

micHowever, these ‘youth’ products are prohibited for no good reason, and quad/dirt bike manufactures have demonstrated that they should be excluded under the law, however, they have yet to obtain an exemption from our “big”…yeah, they are working for us… government!  Clearly the provisions of the law place an unfair burden on the Powersports industry and it’s yet another example of broad-brush legislation with no thought about the unintended consequences.  I’m unaware of any child suffering lead poisoning from chewing on an ATV fender, foot peg, motorcycle seat, or handle bars in any garage?!  So how did this new set of economy damaging laws get passed?

Last Saturday, the CPSC approved the sale of vehicles designed for 12- to 15 year-old riders, units that had been previously banned under the CPSIA, however, the recent statement was simply a verbal clarification that CPSC staff believes that Y12+ ATVs are not subject to the law…not a written exemption or reversal and causing confusion for retailers.

Industry members and enthusiasts have sent thousands of e-mails to Congress through ARRA and other letter-generating Web sites like the motorcycle industry council.  If you want to stop the ban on youth dirt bikes, ATVs or quads please visit the web sites and weigh in on the topic.

Meanwhile I’m going to think about hard-core motocross bikes from KTM….where’s that brochure?

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