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Posts Tagged ‘2014’

2015 Road Glide

2015 Road Glide

Harley-Davidson (NYSE: HOG) released its Q4’14 financial report along with full-year results.  The motor company reported a drop in net income for the final quarter, but overall profits were up for the year.

Celebrating its 112th year, Harley-Davidson shipped 270,726 motorcycles around the world in 2014.  The Road Glide had a big comeback and sales have been robust and represented about 14% of total U.S. retail sales in the fourth quarter.

For the full year 2014, the Company shipped 270,726 motorcycles to dealers and distributors, a 3.9 percent increase compared to 2013 and in line with guidance. Full-year revenue from motorcycles was $4.39 billion compared to $4.07 billion in the year-ago period. Revenue from parts and accessories was $875.0 million compared to $873.1 million in 2013.  Consolidated revenue topped the $6 billion mark for the first time since 2006.

In 2014, international sales of new Harley-Davidson’s grew at more than 5% and accounted for more than 36% of total retail Harley-Davidson  motorcycle sales which is up from 30% in 2008.

You can read the full financial press release HERE.

Photo courtesy of H-D.

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SB-Recall-14V537000Harley-Davidson is recalling more than 105,000 motorcycles from the 2014 model year because their clutches may fail, causing stopped bikes to creep forward and potentially crash.  The motor company said it will rebuild clutch master cylinders for motorcycles impacted by the recall.

The company knows of 19 low-speed tip-over crashes tied to the problem, with three minor injuries reported. Bikes named in that recall include the Electra Glide Ultra Classic and the CVO Road King.

The NHTSA recall details follow:

NHTSA Campaign #: 14V537000
Potential Number of Units Affected: 105,746
Vehicle Make | Model | Model Year(s)

  • H-D FLHRSE 2014
  • H-D FLHTCU 2014
  • H-D FLHTCUTC 2014
  • H-D FLHTCUTG 2014
  • H-D FLHTK 2014
  • H-D FLHTKSE 2014
  • H-D FLHTKSHRINE 2014
  • H-D FLHTP 2014
  • H-D FLHX 2014
  • H-D FLHXS 2014
  • H-D FLHXSHRINE 2014
  • H-D FLSTNSE 2014
  • H-D FXSBSE 2014

SUMMARY:
Harley-Davidson Motor Company (Harley-Davidson) is recalling certain model year 2014 Electra Glide Ultra Classic (FLHTCU), Ultra Limited (FLHTK), Police Electra Glide (FLHTP), Street Glide Special (FLHXS), Street Glide (FLHX), Tri Glide Ultra (FLHTCUTG), CVO Limited (FLHTKSE), CVO Road King (FLHRSE), CVO Breakout (FXSBSE), Electra Glide Ultra Classic Twin Cooled (FLHTCUTC), Ultra Limited Shrine (FLHTK SHRINE), Street Glide Shrine (FLHX SHRINE), and CVO Softail Deluxe (FLSTNSE). In the affected motorcycles, a component in the clutch master cylinder may fail, reducing the pressure available to keep the clutch disengaged.

CONSEQUENCE:
If the clutch does not remain disengaged, the motorcycle may creep forward while the rider intends to be stopped, increasing the risk of a crash.

REMEDY:
Harley-Davidson will notify owners, and dealers will rebuild the affected clutch master cylinders, free of charge. The recall is expected to begin in September 2014. Owners may contact Harley-Davidson customer service at 1-800-258-2464. Harley-Davidson’s number for this recall is 0159 and 0160.

In addition the motor company is also recalling 1,384 motorcycles made earlier this year to test for possible fuel tank leaks.  The recall is on model year 2015 XG500 and XG750 motorcycles manufactured June 11, 2014, to August 14, 2014.  Dealers will test fuel tanks subject to that recall and replace them for free if any leak from under their caps. No injuries, accidents or fires have been tied to that problem.

Photo courtesy of H-D.

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French Glen, Oregon

French Glen, Oregon

No blog post can touch on the full spectrum of a trip, but I’ve put together some snippets of what our “off-season” ride looked like heading to Laughlin River Run in April.

You might say we got a sense of the diverse charms that spring weather in Oregon provides by starting in Portland and tracing a route up the slopes of Mount Hood and then south toward Bend then east to Burns.

Can anyone say weather woes?  There was wind, rain, heavy thunderstorms, hail, lighting BOOM! and all of this during the first 5 hours of the trip!

Harney County - Oregon

Malheur Lake in Harney County – Oregon

By no means am I complaining, but even with all the technology to expand our knowledge about weather patterns and conditions sooner or later, you’ll have to ride in the rain… and did we ever.  After the 5-hour trip to Burns we are now certified wet-weather professionals!  By the time these cold and weary travelers stopped in Burns we were done with the wind-chill riding.

This part of the trip was like a steeled-toed kick into springs teeth!  Winter reigned.

Plugging In

Plugged in outside of Winnemucca

As a side bar, have you ever noticed the difficulty of heated gear and in routing the cables and making the connections?  I typically avoid “plugging-in” until it’s very cold and  raining.  The extra rain gear and winter clothing is bulky and then we’re trying to route these COAX 2.5mm connectors through the sleeves into a SAE 2-pin connector and somewhere in the mix is either an on/off switch or a single controller that allows you to control the vest or any other item connected to the vest (gloves, pants, socks) as one single zone.  This rarely works well when there are multiple heated garments because they develop hot spots and I’ve had a vest get too hot while the gloves were cool and those dual electronic controller units for two separate zones mean even more wires and more expense.  Yeah, it all looks easy enough sitting in the motel room, but the reality is it takes coordination to get it all on, position it correctly so that you have freedom to move and then it’s a “do-over” after a fuel or rest stop.  It should be easier?

Eastern Sierra NV Mountains

Eastern Sierra NV Mountains

At any rate, the next morning we grabbed a sausage biscuit, put on rain gear, “plugged-in” and rode out early from Burns toward French Glen.  We took the French Glen Highway (or Oregon Route 205) to avoid the worst of the rainy weather.  Part of the group was headed directly to Las Vegas (700+ miles) and wanted to put some major miles on vs. the remainder of the group planned a more leisurely ride down to Laughlin with a day or so in Death Valley.

“America’s Patriotic Home” — Hawthorne, Nevada.

Ammunition Depot at “America’s Patriotic Home” — Hawthorne, Nevada.

We headed east then turned south on Oregon Route 205 through the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge where the summers are short and it’s home to countless migratory birds.  Despite the seeming nakedness of the landscape on most of the route, this area of Southeastern Oregon which OR-205 travels through is a true wonderland of high desert topography. There are no less than four designated scenic byways that take off from OR-205, or is the route itself.  From a motorcycling perspective, the road isn’t all that challenging and like many little used desert highways in Oregon, the actual road surface is in good condition for the entire route.  For a majority of the ride, the road is straight with a few long bends that, fortunately, change your perspective of the wide open landscape occasionally.

Parked at Motel - Hawthorne, NV

Parked at Motel – Hawthorne, NV

I’d like to tell you all about the photographic panoramas and the many intriguing natural geologic pictures I took in the spectacular mountain range, but there was heavy fog, mixed with thunderstorms and for a couple hours outside of French Glen we even rode in full on snow flurries.  And I’m not talking about a blizzard of Snow Geese mind you, but traversing the area in blinding snow.  We did see the French Glen “Historic” telephone booth!

This trip didn’t offer us the time to ride Steens Mountain loop road, or continue over the summit ridge and onto the Alvord Desert.

We did the math.  We double checked weather radar and this was the quickest and the logical adverse weather avoidance route.  We hoped to avoid much of it, but the storm and high winds engulfed the entire state.  As we motored on my mind wondered if this was how the settlers and fortune-seekers who made their way West through gorges and high-mountain lakes had to deal with during their overland route.

By the time we hit the Winnemucca stopover point, the weather was beginning to improve.  At least the snow and rain had stopped.  Winnemucca is a gateway of sorts to the Great Basin, with Idaho and Oregon to the north, Salt Lake City to the east and Reno to the southwest.  It’s located at the crossroads of Interstate 80 and U.S. Highway 95.  We did notice that a strong wind was blowing out of the south.  This was high-wind warnings and there were a lot of semi’s pulled over to the side of the road waiting it out.

After a lot of miles I became convinced that the great state of Nevada had the sole purpose of being an ATV enthusiast’s playground.  Of course, this isn’t 100 percent accurate, but as you ride along the desolate roads it might as well be.  The sand in the air blew into our faces, covering us with a fine layer as we rolled on the throttle and continued south down Highway 95.

The group I was riding in overnighted in “America’s Patriotic Home” — Hawthorne, Nevada.  The town is unique with Walker Lake at the foot of Mt. Grant, but more importantly there is the Naval Undersea Warfare Center and the Ammunition Depot in the area.  At first glance that is incongruous since it’s in high desert east of the Sierra Nevada and at least 300 miles from the nearest ocean.  The Army stores some nasty stuff at what started out life as the Hawthorne Naval Ammunition Depot (NAD).  The facility is made up of hundreds of buildings spread over more than 225 square miles and bunkers dot the sagebrush-covered hills which are visible from the highway.  Sadly, back in March 2013 a mortar shell explosion killed 7 marines and injured eight during mountain warfare training in the area.

We overnighted in Hawthorne which is shouldering its share of the economic slump as there are empty storefronts with windows neatly covered with plywood painted white, red and blue stars. We found a Mexican restaurant called Diego’s which was within walking distance of the motel and after a 425 mile day enjoyed some refreshments and good food.

We were headed to Death Valley via the eastern entrance at Beatty and planned to stay over at Stovepipe Wells and ride around the valley floor for a day.

The Ride To Laughlin 2014 – Part 2 (HERE).

Photo’s taken by author except French Glen photo courtesy of Jamie Francis/The Oregonian

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"No Colors" Memo

“No Colors” Memo

One of the largest motorcycle events on the west coast will occur in about 3 weeks.

I’m talking about the Laughlin River Run, April 24-27th.  And 2014 will mark 32 years of riding on the Colorado river for this motorcycle rally.

Back in 2011 the posse rode to the event and several of us are planning to do the same this year.  We’re hoping the west coast drought will swing a bit north for our departure and the northwest rain will stop for a few days.

Recently one of the riders in the group received a memo from Sean Hammond, General Manager of the Aquarius Casino Resort (see photo).  He outlines the “No Colors” rule being strictly enforced in all the area hotels/casinos.  While it has not been without it’s issues the heavy handed LEO presence always seems unnecessary, but then again the days of HAMC clubbers performing motorcycle wheelies as guests tried to check-in at the Flamingo (as it was previously known) was a bit of a nuisance.

Sure the room rates are artificially raised as is the cost to get there, but for those of us who don’t have 300+ days of riding, the opportunity to ride the Sierra Nevada mountains and take in historic U.S. Route 66, along with the hills of Oatman is always a memorable experience.  And it’s a bonus this time of year as the byways are less-traveled and there are few tourist in motorhomes clogging the open road views.

See you in Laughlin.

Photo taken by author.

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2014 Harley-Davidson Breakout

2014 Harley-Davidson Breakout

Harley-Davidson has initiated a voluntary recall in Canada.  

The Campaign number is #2014058 and is targeted at repairing at least 297 motorcycles.

The motorcycles effected are the 2014 Harley-Davidson Breakout and 2014 Harley-Davidson Softail Slim.  According to the Road Safety Recalls Database, the motorcycles may not comply with Canada Motor Vehicle Safety Standard 108 – Lighting System and Retroreflective Devices.

The problem is due to a programming error in the body control module, where the brake lamp lit area may be less than what is allowable by the above standard. This could render the vehicle less visible to other motorists, possibly resulting in a crash causing property damage and/or personal injury.

Dealers will correctly reprogram the settings in the body control module.

Recalls in Canada are often followed by the U.S. counterparts, and it’s anticipated that the NHTSA will be involved shortly and the effected number of motorcycles will increase.

Photo courtesy of H-D.

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IMG_4434It’s my chance to simply say: Thank you!

The day doesn’t get the pomp and circumstance of some other holidays, but today is the time to recognize the heroes among us.

They are the men and women who served in our armed forces. They are the veterans of the United States military.

So, today join me to express our gratitude and say thank you.

Photo taken by author.

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Cut-Away of 103 cu in “Twin-Cooled" Engine

Cut-Away of 103 cu in “Twin-Cooled” Engine

The ideal heat exchanger design and cooling calculations have been a major topic in the Harley-Davidson motorcycle community for some time.

The rumors that Harley-Davidson was eyeing a liquid-cooled motor design have been circling for years and now with the introduction of the 2014 models, it’s the first time (sans V-Rod), that the company jumped into the “water” with their touring models.

There were a number of changes which came out of the RUSHMORE project, but on the new touring models, the core ethos of change seems to start at the motor itself, where Harley-Davidson calls it “Twin-Cooled” cooling.  BMW calls their new partially water-cooled boxer engine setup “Precision Cooling.”

Backside Cut-Away of 103 cu in “Twin-Cooled” Engine

Backside Cut-Away of 103 cu in “Twin-Cooled” Engine

This is a little like the rabbit calling the donkey “Big Ears”… what’s in a name?!

Well everything if you’re a marketing jock.

You have to admit that “Precision” cooling implies something better and has a certain performance connotation attached to the name vs. “Twin-Cooled or the alternative “Partial” liquid-cooling.

The fact of the matter is that Harley-Davidson patented the clever way of adding liquid-cooling to its iconic V-twin motor design back in 2009.  Some elements of the design date back to 2007 when Erik Buell had a hand in the process.

Some of the patent specifics can be reviewed at:

  • US 2011/0114044 A1 – Nov 18, 2009 (File Date) May 19, 2011 (Publish Date) – CYLINDER HEAD COOLING SYSTEM
  • US 7654357 —  Jul 2, 2007 (File Date) Feb 2, 2010 (Publish Date) – Buell Motorcycle Company Radiator coil mounted on a motorcycle
  • US 20090008180 —  Jul 2, 2007 (File Date) Jan 8, 2009 (Publish Date) – Erik Buell Resilient mounting arrangement for a motorcycle radiator
Lower fairing coolant piping diagram

Early patent filing of lower fairing coolant diagram

At any rate, the “Twin-Cooled” system is thermostatically controlled, and uses an electric pump to circulate coolant.  The liquid coolant, is based on glycolethylene, the same coolant blend as in the V-Rod – a 50/50 premix that uses long life coolant.  It is routed through the cylinder heads, which is the most thermally stressed parts of the engine and in the area around the exhaust valves.  It’s then ducted to heat exchangers located in the left and right fairing lowers.  The new dual radiators are compact and the V-twin iconic barrel cooling fins remain.

Liquid-cooled Heads

Early patent filing of Liquid-cooled Heads

The expectation of this new setup is that riders won’t feel the crotch-melting temperatures in slow traffic because cylinder head temperatures are lower and the reshaped fairing lowers improve venting of cooler air to the rider and passenger.

Important to note is that the V-twin engines still use air/oil cooling for the barrel assemblies which to a certain “degree” retain that heritage of Harley’s air-cooled technology.  And the air cooling still does the heavy lifting.  Meaning it remains as a high percentage of the total cooling formula of the system.

Production Version of the Twin-Cooled Engine

Production version of the 2014 “Twin-Cooled” Engine

Harley-Davidson has yet to provide specs on the increased weight of the new cooling system vs. the previous air/oil cooling system.  But, it’s projected to be in the 10+ pound range, however, when has H-D been concerned with weight on the touring bikes given all the chrome dripping off those models.

There are a couple of oddities with the new liquid cooled change.  The first being that liquid cooling has no effect on service intervals.  Harleys with Twin-Cooled or standard air/oil cooled engines require service after the first 1,000 miles, and 5,000 miles thereafter.  And unlike oil and air-cooled engines which adjust timing to avoid spark knock as temperatures increase, Twin-Cooled engines retain the same timing.  I’m not sure what’s behind the thinking on this.

In addition, you might think that Harley boosted engine output.  They did, between 5 and 7%, but it wasn’t all due to liquid-cooled heads.  They also applied new cam profiles with higher lift and duration, which aids overall performance on both the standard and Twin-Cooled engines.

I’ve heard some rumblings from a riding buddy with contacts at the Arizona Test Track, that Harley-Davidson is having some issues with the 110 cu. in. Twin-Cooled ability to truly keep the heads cool(er).  This might be a first year implementation issue, but I believe Harley’s Twin-Cooling system is here to stay, and will likely expand throughout their lineup of motorcycles.

Photo of cut-away engine taken by author at 110th Anniversary factory tours, all others courtesy of H-D.

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