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Posts Tagged ‘1971’

Low Rider

XLCR Café Racer

The Low Rider model was first released back in 1971.

Harley-Davidson introduced the FXS Low Rider® to the public in Daytona Beach.  With drag style handlebars, unique engine and paint treatments, the Low Rider placed the rider in a lowered seating position than was typical.  Then later that year, Willie G. Davidson penned a version of the Sportster, called the XLCR Café Racer.  Pronounced “Excelsior” and wearing a small bikini fairing, relatively low handlebars, and blacked-out paint with whitewall tires, the XLCR was only produced for two years.

This was Harley-Davidson’s response to the growing cafe racer and sport bike trend among European and Japanese brands at the time.  It was largely ignored by buyers at launch, but 1977-1979 XLCR models have become somewhat coveted by Harley-Davidson collectors in recent years.

2014 Low Rider

2014 Low Rider

Harley-Davidson executed a redux and brought back a 2014 version of the Low Rider which the motor company promises contained “old school class and exciting new performance.”  It’s got the Harley Twin Cam 103 engine and features dual front disc brakes, a 2-into-1 exhaust, and traditional Harley styling.  The ergonomics of the new Low Rider have been enhanced to provide the most comfortable ride possible.

The SuperLow® 1200T is, as the T suggests, more of a touring machine. It runs the Evolution V-Twin engine — but weighs an advertised 118 pounds less than the company’s lightest Big Twin touring bike — and comes standard with a detachable windshield, locking saddlebags and Michelin® Scorcher™ 11T touring tires.  The machines got their official public unveiling at this year’s Daytona Bike Week festivities… a bit of déjà vu’ from 1977.

Photos courtesy of H-D.  XLCR Club (HERE).

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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Allman_Brothers

Allman Brothers Band

I was born in Georgia and “eat-a-peach” has always had a special meaning to me.

It was 38 years ago last week when Duane Allman kick-started his Harley-Davidson Sportster on an autumn evening in Macon, Georgia.

It had been only a couple months after the summer release and success of the At Fillmore East album which was one of the greatest and high-quality live performances ever recorded.  Stormy Monday (listen to it HERE) is the ultimate blues song.  Duane was taking a break from touring and recording while riding his motorcycle.  A few miles down the road, an oncoming Sam Hall & Sons construction truck was turning well in front of him, but suddenly stopped in mid-intersection and Duane clipped the rear end of the flatbed truck, sustaining fatal injuries. The lead guitarist of the Allman Brothers Band was dead on October 29, 1971 at age 24.

It’s easy to understand how this album is one of the all time great live performances with Gregg Allman’s gritty vocals and dual lead-guitars of Duane and Dickey Betts. The long improvisations on the album never get old.  It was also eerie when bass guitarist Berry Oakley who died in a similar motorcycle accident just 13 months later within 3 blocks of Duane Allman’s fatal accident. No matter what the circumstances, deaths in the world of rock and roll tend to be romanticized over the years and less to do with the tragedy than it does with having good memories.

Duane Allman was one of the most influential guitarists of our time and this post is to remember Skydog.

Photo courtesy of Def Jam Music Group.

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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