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Archive for the ‘105th Anniversary’ Category

Vietnam Vet Ray Jordan of Salem, OR who decked his 2003 Road King with 105 American Flags for the 105th Anniversary.

Vietnam Vet Ray Jordan of Salem, OR who decked his 2003 Road King with 105 American Flags for the H-D 105th Anniversary Parade.

Next week we will celebrate the 237th anniversary of the adoption of the Declaration of Independence.

It happens on July 4th and sure we’re in the middle of what seems like a “J. Edgar” moment with this PRISM gig – Big Government infringing on civil liberties – but, the mysterious man did some great things and it seems we’re always preoccupied with those items that divide us versus the things that pull us together.

Here is an interesting video about the American Experience that reminds us to celebrate this occasion.  It’s from the Bicentennial anniversary and a nice retro look back.

I think we live in a great country, the only one in the world founded on the power of ideas, freedom, equality and the notion that you can come from nothing and become something through hard work and determination.  And like many of you I lack grandeur in my heritage and was raised by hard working, middle class parents who provided all the essentials necessary to raise an educated, healthy, motivated family with a sound ethical background.

And as a member of the motorcycle riding community I know there are a lot of individualists out there who follow their own path and beat the drum to their own song.  So whether celebrating the day with a BBQ, family picnic or solo with the wind in your face… enjoy your freedom and independence!

Flags courtesy of MKEimages.com at the Harley-Davidson 105th Anniversary parade.  The motorcycle belongs to Vietnam Vet Ray Jordan of Salem, OR who decked his 2003 Road King with 105 American Flags for the 105th Anniversary Parade. 

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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I don’t know about you, but I’ve yet to finalize all my ride plans for this summer.  However, I do know where I’ll be riding in August 2013.

Huh?

That’s right it’s more than a year away, but I’ve started making plans to attend the 110th Harley-Davidson Anniversary celebration in Milwaukee which kicks off on August 29, 2013!  It’s also the H.O.G. 3oth Anniversary celebration.

Back in 2008 the event was called the “The Ride Home” for the 105th Anniversary celebration and in my view was an incredible event which was topped off by the Springsteen concert.  It was a breath of fresh air riding out to this event compared to the typical west coast venues our posse attends.  The celebration was awesome and Harley-Davidson scored big in my book.  Most important was the terrific city and all the Milwaukeeans who welcomed us riders with open arms.

It turns out that H.O.G. members got a jump on the process this past week to make hotel reservations, but it all opens up to the public today so if you’re interested get on the web site and check it out.

If you’re looking to get a feel for the ride out to the celebration you can view my 105th Anniversary posts HERE where we started out on the journey.  If you’re looking for a view of just the celebration then start at this post HERE where we kicked off the event or if you want more detail about Knucklefest then go HERE or for a wrap up of the event HERE.  If you’re looking for a recap and a shout out to the Miller girls then go HERE.

Clearly there is a lot to do at the H-D Anniversary celebration and it’s best to get a jump on planning for it early.

Photo courtesy of H-D and H.O.G.

All Rights Reserved © Northwest Harley Blog

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Miller Brewery

Miller Brewery

The main set of 105th Celebration events are over – now what?  First off a shout-out to Harley.  They know how to throw a party and no one serves as a better host than the people of Milwaukee.  To put on an event of the 105th  size, takes commitment, organization, time, resources and of course, a great product so thank you Harley-Davidson!

It’s Sunday, August 31st, our final day in Milwaukee and it left us thinking about what we neglected to do.  It seemed the only items we opted out of besides the parade was a cheese tour (I had cheese on the way out..) and donating to the Wisconsin Red Cross Blood Drive!  It’s unlikely they would want our blood.

Miller Operations

Miller Operations

Instead we set the day in motion by heading over to the Miller Brewery.  We heard about free samples and knew it was going to hit the mid-80’s again.  To say the Milwaukee weather cooperated for the 105th Anniversary celebration is an understatement.  It was down right awesome.  A bit warm and humid for those of us from the Northwest, but better than we could have hoped for.

Plank Road

Plank Road

We brought our love of beer and stopped at the Brewery tour! We watched the 10 minute video and walked up and down the 4 blocks of the tour.  By the time we hit the Brew Kettle’s I think the gal was just hoping we’d go directly to the R&R area.  It’s an interesting time in the brewery biz.  Anheuser-Busch recently merged with Belgian-Brazilian brewing company InBev for $46B…yes that’s BILLION.   And back in 2002 South Africa Breweries bought Miller Brewing Company and called it SABMiller.  Then in 2005 Coors merges with Molson and then this year SABMiller and Molson Coors entered into a joint venture to form MillerCoors. 

Miller Brewery Girls

Miller Brewery Girls

A long way from the days of when Frederick J. Miller brought his passion for beer to the U.S. and settled in Milwaukee in 1855 where he bought the Plank Road Brewery.

Like all the people we met in Milwaukee it was no exception to find interesting and nice folks at the brewery too.  We sat for a good while and enjoyed our refreshments then said good-bye to the Miller High Life!

On a whim we decided to try a Harley-Davidson Museum drive by.  None of us received tickets to the museum as part of the lottery system, but we thought at least we could hang out on the grounds or if lucky score an open back door. 

HD Museum

HD Museum

The museum is located near downtown and is set on 20 acres of land which is surrounded on three sides of the Menomonee River.  It looks like a part of town that is getting ready for urban expansion and HD will be one of the major tenants of the renovation.

We parked the bikes and did a little fact-finding only to be rewarded with tickets to enter the museum.  Scored!

The museum truly should be on any Harley-Davidson motorcycle owners list of things to see and absorb.  The museum’s steel and glass exterior has an urban elegance and almost seems out of place in this area of town. 

HD Wall of Tanks

HD Wall of Tanks

The exhibits are unique and the stories of those who lived the HD life are remarkable.  From the recreation of the 1920’s board track, to serial number one of the first HD built in 1903 to the “King of Rock”, Elvis Presley’s 1956 KH motorcycle to the extensive and rare collection of vintage advertising and riding gear to the replica of Easy Rider.  Something for everyone.  The “tank wall” is a photographers dream come true! 

All of this only a couple blocks away from the luxury boutique hotel aptly named the Iron Horse Hotel.

In my mind there are two kinds of people in this world:  Those who ride Harley-Davidsons and those who wish they did. That’s not a slam on other motorcycles just a viewpoint after meeting and talking to numerous people on our two-wheelin’ journey “home”.  

Jumped on a plane Monday morning, I take a moment to reflect.  The Ride Home and 2576 enjoyable miles later along with an awesome multi-day music celebration comes to a close…110th anyone?!

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1 HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE.

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HD 105th Parade

HD 105th Parade

This is our 3rd day in Milwaukee and it has me in a bit of a head spin and this isn’t my first biker event!

There’s so much to see and do that even the best laid plans get changed or thrown away. To top it off, there are so many people and the venues are so crowded that you’ve got to be willing to take a step back and make alternative plans. Picture (right) is Vietnam Vet Ray Jordan of Salem, OR who decked his 2003 Road King with 105 American Flags for the 105th Anniversary.

We gave some thought to either riding in the Harley parade or sitting on the sideline doing a bit of people watching, but after hearing stories that it was going to take about 5 hours to do the 4 mile route we thought better of that idea.  With over 40,000 hotel rooms booked and 150,000 people in the area the last thing we wanted to do was “melt” in the 90 degree heat while trying to keep our bikes running so we opted out.  I found this cool parade slide show put on by MKEimages.  It was estimated that more than 7500 bikes participated in the parade. 

State Fair Park

State Fair Park

Instead we started the day in line at the State Fair Park waiting to ride the 2009 Harley demo motorcycles.  After looking at the SE “pumpkin orange” Glide the previous day I wanted to get some time in the seat to try it out.  I’m not a fairing guy, but have always been curious about that fixed fairing on the bike and I really wanted to feel the power of 110 cu in!

On our walk into the fairgrounds there was a gal putting a sticker on her bike which caught our attention.  It’s unusual to see people putting stickers on their bike fenders and this gal was dressed like few others. After some discussion about our ride out from OR and her interest in relocating to Seattle along with her “unique” profession at the Mad Planet…she gave us her card which provided a link to her website.  Miss Nix turns out to run a fetish fashion show for the dominatrix crowd which features bed of nails torture and whip cracking.  At 10AM and only one cup of coffee under the belt it was a bit much to absorb, but we tried…

At any rate, we made our way to the Rider check-in and it was easy enough.  The $5 shell card and discount coupon at any Harley dealer was a nice bonus.  It was rather odd that Harley forced the no helmet, no ride rule in a state that doesn’t require it, but we complied.  After check-in we waited in the touring line which took another 45min to finally get onto the bikes.  During the entire wait I was thinking this is taking forever for little 10 minute demo ride around the State Fair park, but it turns out the demo rides were 20-25 minutes long and included a combination of city and Interstate driving giving everyone a chance to try out the handling and performance of the motorcycles. 

2009 SE RoadGlide

2009 SE RoadGlide

Love it or hate it, the frame-mounted fairing is the center of what makes this touring model a pleasure to ride mile after mile. Unlike the popular batwing fairing found on the Street or Electra Glide models, the Road Glide’s fairing is attached to the bike’s frame rather than the front fork, much like the design found on many sport and racing motorcycles. It provides greater stability and less rider fatigue at highway speeds, especially in crosswind situations.

Roadhouse at the Lakefront

Roadhouse at the Lakefront

The route took me out S 76th Street then right on W. National Ave then after a couple miles I was routed onto I-894.  The demo ride team had the route well marked with orange arrows which was excellent since I’m not a Milwaukee native and the roads can be confusing.  After a couple of exits the tour route put me back onto city streets where I looped around to the Fair ground.  When entering the on ramp I throttled up in 2nd and 3rd gears and the bike quickly hit 80MPH in just a few seconds.  Fast!  There was little exhaust note from the stock pipes, but I could hear the intake groan for more air.  Very fast for a stock bike. 

I returned approx 25 minutes later to hear the Harley rep ask me if I had a problem with the bike.  I said no it’s a terrific bike, why?  He then went on a rant… “Dude, you’ve been gone over an hour…did you stop for gas?”  I had a stare down with the guy, but I was gone less than 25min and told him he wrote the departure time down incorrectly or something, but he was in error.  After a few tense moments he backed down especially after I told him the bike I left with came in at the same time in the standard time frame.  Other than the accusation it was an awesome demo ride and wanted to provide a shout-out to the Harley team for providing the motorcycles to ride.

Santiago, Eastwood, Mac

Santiago, Eastwood, Mac

We all departed the demo rides with smiles on our faces and headed off to a local Mexican restaurant for lunch and re-cap our riding experiences.  By mid-afternoon we were looking for some relief from the heat and humidity.  It was in the mid-90 degrees and we headed to a Harley dealer to pick up some refreshments. 

Around 6PM we headed downtown to Veterans Park and the Roadhouse at the Lakefront venue for the Bruce Springsteen concert.  The lawn seating opened at 5pm so we thought a couple hours prior to the concert and we’d have a good view.  We thought wrong!  By the time we hit Lincoln Memorial drive we knew there was going to be issues.  Super long lines of bikes park on all sides of the road including many who navigated the middle divide curb to park on the street. After a long while and several heat related stalls on the Road King we finally found a few bike slots to park.  We made the long walk back to the entrance and were shocked at the crowds who were all ready posted up waiting. 

Bruce Springsteen

Bruce Springsteen

We made our way into the middle and moved forward, but it looked like we were still 2-3 city blocks away from the stage.  Springsteen was ending his World Tour, but you would have never known it was the end.  He played more than 30 songs which lasted over 3.5 hours.  Incredible concert!  About mid-way through we move much closer to the stage and got a lot better view of the concert.  He didn’t play “Born in the U.S.A.” or his “Devils to Dust” anti-war ballad about Iraq.  However, he did make several comments about things that are basically at the heart of being un-American.

It was after 12:30AM and we headed out of the city via the East Side which looked like and had a feel of just arriving in a “hood”.  Arriving back at the hotel in the early morning it was clear that the 105th Anniversary celebration was an incredible success which was topped off by the Springsteen concert.

It was a breath of fresh air riding out to this event.  The celebration was awesome and was put on by a great company.  Most important was the great city and all the Milwaukeeans who welcomed us riders with open arms. 

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1 HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE.

Flags on motorcycle photo courtesy of MKEimages.com and the 105th Anniversary parade.  The motorcycle belongs to Vietnam Vet Ray Jordan of Salem, OR who decked his 2003 Road King with 105 American Flags for the 105th Anniversary. 

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HD Big Twin Operations

HD Big Twin Operations

On our 2nd day in Milwaukee (Friday, Aug 29th) and the F-U-N continues in this largely two-wheelin’ town.

We headed out first thing to visit the Pilgrim Road Powertrain operations which is home of the “Big Twin“.  They produce the Touring, Softail and Dyna engines and transmissions for the final assembly plant in York, Pennsylvania and Kansas City, MO.  The plant sits on 63 acres and has 849,000 square feet.

At the entrance of the building they reminded all of us about the rules to make it a safe experience then over emphasized the NO CAMERA rule including cell phones.  I took that to mean it was a “guideline” and managed to wiggle through the line before a Harley security guard could perform a body search. 

Pilgrim Operations

Pilgrim Operations

We started the tour in reverse order of how the parts are cast and made.  The first area we walked through had a lot of new robotics and assembly area yet to be brought on line.  I repeatedly ask Harley employees during the plant tour about the status of water-cooled powertrains and when they are set to come off the line.  I was greeted with lots of smiles and laughs…but, one tactic which seemed to get a little more information was playing one employee off another…I told a employee, let’s call him Bob, that another employee, let’s call him Stu who we chatted with earlier in the tour,  requested that we ask Bob about the water cooled status. 

Clearly they had all been briefed about giving away company plans, but we did learn that water cooled powertrains is definitely in their thinking (with-in two years!) and that the engine heads were “most likely” to be the first part of the engine to get the water treatment.  Not so much because of heat, but because of EPA noise emission issues and meeting more stringent standards.  Overall the employees we chatted with were very friendly, seem to enjoy mixing it up with the public and they clearly had a sense of pride in what they were making.  I was most impressed with the employees and want to provide a shout out to the USW Local 2-209 and IAM Lodge 78.

After the factory tour we rode down to Summerfest on the Lakefront.  Billed as the “world’s largest music festival” it delivers an incredible live music experience.  There was talent on 11 different stages along with a broad range of food and interactive exhibits.  On the exhibit front I recall a lady presenting something about the need to stay physically fit for best motorcycle riding experience and shared techniques on how to keep your body more fit before, during and after riding.  Interesting bit about the “during” your ride and stretching. 

Knucklefest Bull Riding

Knucklefest Bull Riding

We stopped by the Harley tent and looked over the new ’09 rides.  The “Pumpkin” colored SE RoadGlide had a bunch of CVO brochures in the saddlebag so I scored one as the dealers rarely have or give these out.  After seeing the new bikes we decided it would be good to stop in at the demo area at the State Park/Fair before leaving Milwaukee.  By this time the temperature was in the high 80’s and we seemed to always be looking for a shaded location to enjoy some refreshments. 

We heard from some other riders talking about an event called Knucklefest and decided to take in some more local culture.  Located on the Kettle Moraine Ranch, the ranch lies in the heart of the Kettle Moraine National Forest and features some unique landscape. We rode scenic back roads that intertwine though charming small towns. 

Hals HD

Hals HD

If you head out on this ride you might consider stopping at the Knucklehead Pub & Grub which is located in Eagle on the corner of Hwy 59 and 67. 

We arrived at the site of Knucklefest and realize that it is one of the area’s best kept secrets.  We hung around for the mechanical bull and wet t-shirt contests then headed back toward Milwaukee.

We stopped at Hal’s HD to watch the “Burn Out” fun and then we called it a day after 10+ hours in the heat.
 

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1 HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE.

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It was a bit of a slow morning today after dinner and drinks at the Mermaid pub near the AmericInn in Mounds View, MN.  What with the Splash Bay adventure (indoor 100′ waterslide) an all…

We woke up to find the roads all wet from a series of thunder showers that blew through the region overnight.  Fortunately we were heading in the opposite direction and the main freeway was dry.

By design our “Welcome Home” day was set up to be a shorter ride with a little over 300 miles to cover.  We were staying at the Holiday Inn Express in Delafield which is about 30 minutes west of Milwaukee.  As a tight knit group that’s been riding together for years we spent some time over breakfast debating freeway vs. alternative back roads, but decided that the incentive of seeing the world’s largest ball of twine paled in comparison to just getting “home”.

WisDOT Oil-Mix Repave

WisDOT Oil-Mix Repave

There was a change in the air…we started seeing more motorcycles.  After two hours into the ride it was clear we were on to something big as there were now a lot of motorcycles on the road. 

And speaking of roads the Wisconsin DOT has it hands full.  I’ve never ridden an Interstate that had so many cracks, ruts, seeping oil and holes as I-94.  We came upon several “repaving” sections where WisDOTs oil-mix covered with light sand had me thinking of dirt track days in my youth!  In addition there were a number of areas where they were milling off the top of the two concrete slabs where they mate up. 

Wisconsin Fun

Wisconsin Fun

I’m not sure what they were trying to accomplish, but it was like an orange peel…open and rough, rather than an apple peel, smooth and tight.  Don’t like my fruit analogy?  Then choose your own…bottom line it was over a hundred miles of brittle, bumpy riding.  It wasn’t any better the closer we got to Milwaukee and later on we found that the urban roads in and around Milwaukee also had deteriorated or were worse than the Interstate.  They have a major issue as described in this report.

Santiago and Eastwood

Santiago and Eastwood

We arrived mid-afternoon and to commemorate our achievement we rinsed the 2,176 miles of bugs off the bikes.  The Holiday Inn had set up a great bike wash area and we took some time over refreshments to reflect on The Ride Home and chat with all the riders who descended on the hotel and made the pilgrimage too.

Next up are the accounts of the action on the ground from the HOG 25th and 105th event celebrations…

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1 HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE

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Mac

Mac

The previous day could be best summarized as bugs, wind and heat!

Hoping for less wind than yesterday’s Montana adventure we got up early.  Actually, one of the guys in the posse (and you won’t believe this), wakes up minutes prior to the time of the alarm!  As if he has some subconscious alarm clock telling him it’s time to go. 

At any rate, we were greeted with even more wind than the previous day which meant full-face helmets to provide some relief from the 30MPH sustained, gusting to 40MPH “breeze.”  The weather service issued a wind advisory across the entire NoDak state…like we didn’t notice!

NoDak Farmland

NoDak Farmland

US Highway 2 runs east-west through the northern side of NoDak and Interstate 94 runs east-west through the southern side of state. Interstate 29 runs north-south on the eastern edge of the state.  We made a mid-course change in our plans and decided to drop down and take one of only two major roads in North Dakota which runs diagonal (northwest-southeast) through the state — US Highway 52.

US 52 provides an ever changing mix of agricultural farm and pasture land, native wetlands, and small lakes set on rolling landscape, but the wind was howling and made for wicked motrcycle driving!  Tolerable as long as we headed directly into the gusts, but on US 52 we were often diagonal to the wind direction and it was interesting riding having to compensate.  All day I couldn’t help but wonder when are they going to turn North Dakota into one big-ass wind farm…

Farm

Farm

We picked up Interstate 94 east at Jamestown.  Louis L’Amour, the western novelist, and Darin Erstad, the pro baseball player in the 2002 World Champion Anaheim Angels, are both natives.  In my “fun fact” search of NoDak tidbits I ran across this little video of some dude’s cam-cording the NoDak landscape from his pickup truck while driving across I-94…and listening to some kind of Scottish music.  Can you spell F-U-N?!

About an hour later we arrived in Fargo.   Fargo is the largest city in North Dakota and situated on the Red River.  It’s the place people most relate to in the Coen Brothers movie starring Oscar-winner Frances McDormand and William H. Macy.

10,000 Lakes

10,000 Lakes

Another 3 hours of wind-whip-lash we were approaching the Twin Cities (St. Paul and Minneapolis).   It’s hard to determine which city you are actually in.  There is no visible dividing line; the cities really do blend into one another.  Minneapolis is an all American city, the people are chill, there’s no east coast ‘tude, and there’s water everywhere…a great vibe.  The best part of the day was that we’d seen the wind drop off significantly and the end of a 500 mile day came to a close.

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE

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Havre Sunrise

Havre Sunrise

I got up early and went outside to stretch my legs for a bit. It’s nice outside, mid-70’s, which makes it a decent temperature for riding.  

We departed Havre, MT about 8:30am on the 3rd day.  For reference day #3 was Monday, August 25th.  We lost an hour of sleep due to the mountain time zone change and felt a bit rushed once we realized it was going to be a high mileage day.  We wanted to get some miles under our belt before the day’s temperature heated up.

Unknown to us was the fact that the largest infrastructure project ever tackled by the Montana Department of Transportation was finished just prior to our arrival.  A $30 million project spanned 33 blocks of Highway 2 within Havre’s city limits. More than 280 businesses and residents now have entrances to their property right off the Highway.

At 11am it was 90 degrees and by 1pm the temp gauge on my windshield was pegged at 100.

Montana Farmland

Montana Farmland

We had to suffer some and be uncomfortable most of the day. It’s incredibly monotonous scenery now, some rolling hills, but mostly wheat plains into the horizon as far as you can see with the occasional Milk River crossing breaking it up.   The Milk River is a tributary of the Missouri River, and runs 729 miles long thru the state of Montana and the Canadian province of Alberta.  The river got it’s name from Captain Meriwether Lewis, of the Lewis and Clark Expedition, who described it as:

“the water of this river possesses a peculiar whiteness, being about the colour of a cup of tea with the admixture of a tablespoonfull of milk. from the colour of its water we called it Milk river.”

We crossed this river all day long and I lost count of the number of overpasses or small bridges. 

From Havre to the North Dakota border, the surrounding area is known as “The Hi-Line“.  To the locals who know it from the early Great Northern railway route.  My Montana relatives always refer to this area as the “Golden Triangle” which is one of the most productive farming regions in the country.

We continued east through the Fort Belknap Indian Reservation then to Malta. From Malta, we continued on to Glasgow, just north of Fort Peck Dam, and then into the Fort Peck Indian Reservation. We stayed either on or within the reservation for much of the remaining trip through Montana. On the reservation it goes through Wolf Point and Poplar, and then exits the reservation a short distance before leaving the state.  We hit the final town in Montana of Bainville and said goodbye to the “Big Sky” state.

Welcome To North Dakota

Welcome To North Dakota

We stopped at the North Dakota border for a “welcome” to the state photo op.  North Dakota has been converting sections of US 2 from two lanes to four lanes for many, many years. The section from Grand Forks to Minot was completed several years ago. The section from Williston to Minot was just completed this year in a campaign that began a few years back and was labeled “Across the State in Two Thousand Eight”.   In actually, US 2 is a four-lane road now from the eastern edge of Williston for a stretch of about 343 miles, leaving only 12 miles to the Montana border which is a two-lane highway.

Between Williston and Minot, the road provides several high points where you can view beautiful landscape for many miles in all directions.   We ended our riding day in Minot after ~440miles.

Interested to know more about our “Ride Home”?  Read the road blogs for: Day 1HERE, Day 2 HERE, Day 3 HERE, Day 4 HERE and Day 5 HERE

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It showed up in my inbox.  I was randomly selected by the “Harley Research Team” to participate in an online survey. 

As a registered ticket holder for the Harley-Davidson 105th Anniversary event, I was unique (like the other 100K+ people attending) and “got” to take a survey to help Harley plan for my stay.  Well isn’t that nice that they care so much about my stay in Milwaukee?!

I don’t buy it.  However, I did complete the 10 minute survey which had approximately 7 of the 20+ questions asking me about my plans to buy a new motorcycle and if so which manufacture was I considering and the timeframe.  I think the marketing guys got into a conference room with the Dealer network/Sales folks and said, “Hey, why don’t we ping all those 105th ticket holders and see how many are planning to buy a new motorcycle”?  “Maybe they haven’t heard about all the new Copper-tone 105th models we have in show rooms”? 

There were no questions about the Museum or attendance.  That is discouraging since I didn’t get a ticket via the lottery process and the museum is closed during the 105th.  I’ve whined enough about that though previously.

The email goes something like this:

Dear Mac,

The Harley-Davidson 105th Anniversary celebration is almost here! As a
registered 105th Anniversary ticket holder, please take a moment to complete
a short survey for our internal research team.  This is not a sales pitch.
Your feedback will help us plan for your stay in Milwaukee.

For participating, you will be entered into a drawing to win ONE of five $100
gift certificates to be used at any Harley-Davidson dealer. Click on the link
below to access the online survey.

If you are using AOL or if you have any problems linking to the survey, please
copy and paste the below survey link into the address line of your Internet
browser, and then manually enter your password in the space provided.

Survey Link:  http://www.surveyzone.net/s058

I know I’m busting Harley’s chops on this, but I’m fairly confident the email survey is about trying to anticipate/predict the attendance turn out of the 105th event and get some sales data.  With Sturgis attendance down this year it only stands to reason they would confirm ticket holders who indeed do plan to attend the event.

I hope they get the “Honey Bucket” count accurate because I hate standing in long “relief” lines!

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This week Harley performed a “ribbon-cutting” ceremony that made welder’s around the world proud…using an acetylene torch Jerry Gagner (museum maintenance crew) lit the torch and let the sparks fly as he cut through motorcycle chains to officially open the new Milwaukee museum.
 
At a cost of $78 million the 130,000-square-foot museum includes exhibits, a 150-seat restaurant called Motor, a take-away restaurant called Café Racer, along with special events and meeting space and 20 acres of outdoor green space.  The overall theme of the museum is to tell stories about the people, products, history and culture of Harley-Davidson. The stories are told through Vintage photographs, posters and other artifacts which explain Harleys history.

But most (including me!) of the 105th Anniversary attendees will be locked out!  Harley tells it like this:

Myth #4:  You can get into the Museum during the 105th Anniversary celebration in August.
Busted: Museum tickets are not available during the Harley-Davidson 105th Anniversary Celebration August 28-31, 2008. To ensure an excellent experience during the 105th Anniversary Celebration, tickets to the Museum were already distributed via a lottery system; therefore, the Museum is closed to the public during the 105th Anniversary.

Those who are planning to come to Milwaukee during the 105th Anniversary who don’t have a Museum ticket still will be able to enjoy the Museum grounds. In addition, those who would like to visit the Museum and didn’t receive a ticket through the lottery can purchase Museum tickets before and after the Labor Day weekend (while supplies last).

It turns out that people who purchased tickets for the 105th event prior to November 30, 2007 were part of a random drawing/lottery to receive Museum tickets.  Sure, I’m welcome to hang out on the Museum grounds, enjoy the river walk and green space, listen to bands, people watch or try and locate a rivet, but I’m bummed
 
Photo Credit : Scott Paulus and the Milwaukee Business Journal.  Museum credit Harley.

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